read an interview on Impuls with Mr Pinkcourtesyphone.

read an interview on Headphone Commute with Mr Pinkcourtesyphone.

read a saucy interview with BUTT Magazine with Mr Pinkcourtesyphone.

 

… it’s fantastic. i’m jealous and trying to insinuate myself into the group.
(William Basinski, celebrity tapelooper) 

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… what a wonderful thing that was
(Tom Ravenscroft, BBC RADIO6)

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Heard as comment on the superficial surreality and narcotic, hallucinatory atmosphere of his LA environs, the project finds an inquisitive balance of ambience and an underlying, seductively void-like darkness. It’s slow-sipping music for art-deco mansions in the hills and smoky bedrooms alike; playing on that Lynch/Badalamenti vibe that somehow perfectly mirrors the strange paradigms of waking and dream life. The album seamlessly introduces three pieces of sanguine narcotic drift in the twenty minute opener, ‘Why Pretend / The Desire of Absence / Faulty Connections’ before opening up the suggestive negative spaces of ‘Pixels… Sometimes… Broke Your Heart (for A.)’ where elusive chamber harmonics tease from behind ambient tones reminding of AFX’s SAW II set. ‘Falling Stars (for P. Entwistle)’ is a more concise slice of crepuscular atmosphere, surrounded by cicadas and the tinkle of cocktail glasses and a lone voice drifting on the breeze, whilst ’62,000 Valentines (for T. Hunter)’ melts into more intimate, internalised space for ten minutes of warm yet deeply detached ambient ambiguity conjuring that feeling of staring into the mirror for too long…
(boomkat.com on A Ravishment of Mirror)

After last year’s Foley Folly Folio and Elegant and Detached, audiovisual conceptualist Richard Chartier further pursues his Pinkcourtesyphone conceit with A Ravishment of Mirror, seemingly a hyper-timbral satire on/elegy to his LA homeland–city of light and noir. The object of its sonic semiosis is a mythic early Hollywood and the fixation with dreams and surface, delusion and deception. ‘A plastic organic unity ready to enfold and repackage you,’ in Chartier’s words, for which he concocts a queerly compelling microsound-lounge ambient-drone hybrid to mirror a woozy waking life in spectral settings. Less static soundscape than protean collage, “Why Pretend / The Desire of Absence / Faulty Connections,” goes from narcotic drift through micro-orchestral tone poem in a choreography of swells and billows, wheezes and whirrs, discreet plosives and inchoate melodies. The suggestive psychoactive apertures of “Pixels… Sometimes… Broke Your Heart (for A.)” fuse oneiric glassine drift and queasy listening redolent of SAW II and haunted ballroom. ‘I am afraid, I am a coward. I am sorry for everything. If I had done this a long time ago, it would have saved a lot of pain.’—read the suicide note of actress Peg Entwistle, found dead under the Hollywood sign, to whom is dedicated “Falling Star”—a vignette of smudged echo and smears of twilight tone, cicada chirp, cocktail tinkle, and a lone breeze-borne voice. “62,000 Valentines,” hommage to actor Tab Hunter, hosts a cavernous swathe of romanticist remotion. The Mulholland Drive of Lynch/Badalamenti comes to mind, as, between the nothingness and eternity of elegiac beauty and toxic abyss, Chartier finds an elegant balance of surface blithe spirit and self-conscious noir-ish undertow for one of his least oblique strategies and most expressive works.
(igloomag.com)

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Voix inconnue, et pourtant familière. Rêvée, peut-être. Pinkcourtesyphone, qui n’est autre que Richard Chartier lui-même, continue d’explorer les méandres d’une beauté cinématographique changeante et inquiétante.

Projet en marge et clairement distingué de ses travaux sous son propre nom, Pinkcourtesyphone avait donné le jour à un premier album fascinant et obsédant, Foley Folly Folio, en 2012. S’en était suivi le tout aussi recommandable Elegant and Detached, sur le label Room 40 tenu par Lawrence English. A Ravishment Of Mirror vient ici offrir une suite magistrale et hypnotique aux labyrinthes sonores déjà déployés par Richard Chartier.

Avec pour point de départ la ville de Los Angeles, cet album se voile de miroirs trompeurs, de lumières fugitives et de rêves évanouis. L’un des morceaux est dédié à Peg Entwistle, jeune actrice qui s’est jetée du haut de l’inscription Hollywoodland en 1932. On croise ici l’amertume de ce qui n’était que mirage, sur fond de douceur narcotique. Le paysage urbain se referme peu à peu sur celui qui s’y égare, dans un enveloppement vertigineux et insaisissable. Déambuler puis se perdre. 

Pinkcourtesyphone joue avec les durées, les rythmes, et étire ses morceaux pour effacer tout repère chronologique. Les couches sonores spectrales semblent instables et hésitantes, mais déroulent pourtant un mouvement lent et continuel ouvert sur des abîmes brumeux et irréels. La répétition est à l’œuvre, créant l’illusion. Murmures féminins, froissements de matières et mélodies agonisantes. Les masses changent et les rythmiques se mélangent, comme sur l’impressionnant morceau d’ouverture de plus de vingt-cinq minutes Why Pretend / The Desire of Absence / Faulty Connections. Les notes se transforment et s’effacent petit à petit, transfigurées par des râles métalliques, des souffles amnésiques ou des pépiements étranges.

Un scénario où l’on roulerait de nuit, tous feux éteints, sur des perspectives hallucinées à la fois rassurantes et anxiogènes, familières et inexplorées.
(swqw.fr)

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A Ravishment of Mirror, the third album by LINE manager and sound artist Richard Chartier under the Pinkcourtesyphone name, explores a less hermetic world than Novak’s. Inspired by Chartier’s recently adopted home, Los Angeles, the album material was “formed from places, plastics, and particulars” and uses Hollywood’s fixation on dreams, surface, and deception as its creative impetus. In this case, Chartier’s Hollywood is the glamorous one of yesterday, one more associated with stars like Clift, Davis, Garbo, and Gable rather than the Clooneys and Streeps of today. The recording’s dominant piece is its twenty-six-minute opener, “Why Pretend / The Desire of Absence / Faulty Connections,” which follows bravura flourishes with a controlled ebb-and-flow of whirring sounds, sea-sawing tones, whooshes, exhalations, and muffled detonations—a dream-like, industrial-glam drift of noir-like murmurs that, oddly, evokes feelings of loneliness, yearning, and desire.

In keeping with the album’s City of Angels theme, “Falling Star (for P. Entwistle)” is titled after Millicent Lilian ‘Peg’ Entwistle (1908-1932), a Welsh-born English actress who appeared in several Broadway productions and one posthumously released film, Thirteen Women. Chartier’s ironic title can be taken to refer not only to the actress’s possible career trajectory but also to the fact that she jumped to her death from the ‘H’ on the Hollywood sign at just twenty-four. “62,000 Valentines (for T. Hunter),” on the other hand, presumably pays homage to American actor Tab Hunter (b. 1931), who starred in over forty films.

As different as they are, the album’s four ghostly settings suggest that a prototypical Pinkcourtesyphone piece is less dronescape than shape-shifting soundscape collage. Undercurrents of decadence and corruption run through the material, too, in a way that alludes to the seamy underbelly of the city and the Hollywood Dream. Nevertheless, A Ravishment of Mirror is enticing and at certain moments as psychoactive as absinthe—in Chartier’s own words, “a plastic organic unity ready to enfold and repackage you” and “meant to be slowly sipped.”
(textura.org)

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Pinkcourtesyphone is a new-ish nomenclature for Richard Chartier, an artist much beloved at A Closer Listen. Have a look round – he’s normally there or thereabouts on the end of year lists. With A Ravishment of Mirror, it’s likely he’ll be there or thereabouts again for this is a magnificent album – amid some pretty tough competition it is, I think, one of his best. This is lovely, warm electronic music, from the gradual build of the lengthy opening track to the melancholic ambience of closer “62,000 Valentines (for T. Hunter)”. I heard recently someone reminiscing about the anticipation for a 26 minute track on their favourite prog band’s new album – because if it’s that long it must be good, right? – and being inevitably disappointed. “Why Pretend / The Desire of Absence / Faulty Connections” is a powerful argument in favour of long tracks – it’s a track with a proper narrative and for a minimal electronic track it feels like a lushly orchestrated tone poem. Given the various dedications on the tracks, this might be one of Chartier’s most personal statements—it’s certainly one of his finest hours.
(acloserlisten.com)

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While usually recording under his own name, his work as Pinkcourtesyphone finds him adopting a more lush, sensual palette that falls somewhere between Leyland Kirby and friend and collaborator William Basinski; soft, slow-moving drones of decayed sonic memory waft like clouds of fog through the stereo field, while spectral, disconnected fragments of female voices sigh, coo, and gently whisper from the shadows, as loops of gently swelling string balladry waltz circles around them. It is, in a sense, a more “pop” version of the methodology explored in Basinski’s work, but only via context; there is an eroticism that slowly throbs throughout this breathtaking album’s runtime that many records of a similar ilk often attempt with lackluster results. This album gets constant rotation in my home, and its magic lies in its ability to either blend into your surroundings or to completely envelop them. There is no separation between your environment and Chartier’s upon listening to this; if you play it softly, it will slowly have you spying the corners of the room, across your shoulder, searching for the breath you swear you’d just felt on the back of your neck. Played loudly, you find yourself moving in slow motion through a warmly glowing twilight, somewhat adrift, somewhat illuminated, possibly damp, possibly drowsy. Chartier’s exploration of what feels like a disorienting, lucid wet dream has created one of the best projects of his career, as well as some of the most beautiful ambient music I’ve ever heard.
(othermusic.com on Foley Folly Folio)

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Frank Bretschneider, CoH, Simon Scott, Yann Novak, Yves De Mey and more render the narcotised headspaces of Richard Chartier’s excellent Pinkcourtesyphone project. Some of the tracks, namely the original ‘Iamaphotograph’ with Kid Congo Powers, and the icy dread of CoH’s ‘Blow Up’ re-cut, are previously released whereas the rest is brand new and exclusive. We’re particularly impressed with the ultra-spacious sound design and rolling, sub-heavy techno of Frank Bretschneider’s ‘An Awaiting Room’ rework, and the Mika Vainio-esque dimensions of Yves De Mey’s ‘Singularity Version’, but those seeking the darker seduction of the originals need to check for the weightless negative spaces of Evelina Domnich + Dimitry Gelfand’s ‘Sans’ rework or Yann Novak and Robert Crouch’s ghostly diffusion of ‘Here Is Something… That Is Nothing’ for proper void musics, or the widescreen bloom of Simon Scott’s Succulents remix for ‘A Dark Room Full Of Plastic Plants’ for a lusher resolution.
(boomkat.com on Please Pick Up)

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a gorgeous haunted mood…
(Justin K Broadrick [Godflesh / Final / Jesu] on Foley Folly Folio)

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More soundsourcery this time from from sound and installation artist Richard Chartier, lovely, dark, spooky electronic drifty stuff with intermittent blasts of unexpected sound.  The general feel is of soft washes of sound, the late night hum of factories, the sea, the waves, the thrill of electrical wiring. There are plenty of undulating synths, interrupted by disembodied voices, footsteps down the hallway, late at night. It’s a ghostly album full of buried sounds, lots of half heard noises, like attempting to sleep in a big old creaking house. The usual suspects of Nurse With Wound can be used as a reference but also the modern day composition of Celer and Bvdub are heard in the pastoral stillness.
(Norman Records, UK on Elegant & Detached)

Disorienting, enveloping work from sound artist Richard Chartier. The influence of Leyland Kirby’s Caretaker project is felt, yet there is also an acute awareness of the Blackest Ever Black aesthetic. The evocative titles suggest a rotting American Dream, a music for abandoned airports. High minded references aside, this is amazing full-spectrum ambient drone. Eveningtheme’s plaintive chords may be an homage to Eno.
(amoeba.com on Foley Folly Folio)

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The sounds themselves are certainly different, but Richard Chartier’s second full-length under the Pinkcourtesyphone moniker retains every bit of the mysterious and exploratory nature we are used to hearing under his given name. However, the mood has shifted drastically in adopting a dark, shadowy feel that brings to mind a less-intense Deathprod or a more active Thomas Koner. The dominate sonic material on Elegant and Detached is a wash of reverberating static that sounds equally like distant radio frequencies and wind rushing by an abandoned microphone. Though this is heard on all five of Pinkcourtesyphone’s tracks, Chartier does find space to enter into more familiar territory, particularly with the crumbled synth tones on “An Awaiting Room (For Tati)” and the encroaching digital glitches of “Millimeters Off / Non Us (Tiny).” Despite the differences with his usual approach, the same rules apply: detailed listens will be rewarded.
(Experimedia)

Elegant & Detached, the full length album on Room40, is consistent with the first PCP album, Foley Folly Folio in its use of more relaxed, but still challenging tones and electronics.  The use of various actress dialogue samples emphasizes the PCP aesthetic of electro acoustic music for bored 1950s housewives who love wine and barbiturates.  This sensibility stretches into the music rather well:  the echoing and processing used throughout “Sans Motif/Closer to Here Than You Care to Be” encapsulates a disoriented, valium like haze that drifts into self-aware new age camp towards its conclusion.  “An Awaiting Room (for Tati)/Stars Fell” has a sound that covers Chartier’s solo work and this project, with its crackly, low end textures at its opening, being more in line with his more formal material.  As it goes on, the sound becomes lighter and buoyant via heavy reverb and echo, with the string flourishes that appear toward the end adds in just the right amount of kitsch.  Hinting at the future is the closing “Sans Many Things”, which features a more structured series of thuds and fragments of digital bells that, even through its DSP heavy sound has a deconstructed minimal techno feel.
(brainwashed.com)

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Richard Chartier,  minimalist composer and Line label owner,  has made a welcome change for his new moniker Pinkcourtesyphone,  abandoning his usual exercises in precise and sterile tone generation for brooding ambient odes to solitude,  created from voice samples and heavy use of reverb.  To christen the name,  he released two albums in 2012,  this one,  Foley Folly Folio,  as well as Elegant & Detached,  similar in its desolate wind tunnel drift.  Never have I heard a work from Chartier with such easily discernable,  intense emotions,  or respect for sonic beauty as it is conventionally understood.

Hearing the cesspool of lonely thoughts that is opener “Wistful Wishful Wanton”,  I find myself simply amazed at these sounds,  which I would have never believed Chartier capable of,  despite one particularly nice collection of melodic soundcurrents,  a collaboration with William Basinski,  the modestly titled Untitled 1-3.  The sluggish,  circling dance of loops recalls the satanic,  subterranean mental landscapes of Lustmord.  The last couple of minutes of the piece are an uneasy alternation of chords and a crackling voice repeating “The most wonderful night… of my life…”.  There is extraneous rustling noise and hiss throughout the album (another contrast to the deep silence of most Chartier works),  and it’s possible tape loops were used.

The meat of the album is the 3 middle tracks,  each exceeding 20 minutes in length.  These are quieter and slower than the opener.  Chartier often lets the drift gradually taper off almost into nothingness before introducing some kind of striking reverberant gesture.  One hears whispers and remote thunderclaps along the periphery,  the muddy visages of forgotten angels.  ”A Dark Room of Plastic Plants” lives up to its lovely name,  conjuring images of environs sitting still,  undisturbed.  This track is particular is more peaceful and consonant than the uneasy first., The 4th piece “Afternoon Theme / Germs Through Wires / Evening Theme” is perhaps the best to be found here,  commencing with a lilting clarinet melody which patiently recedes over several minutes into a voice sample singing the same melody,  a haunting effect.  The sound scales back further into a hushed,  hinted drone complimented by shimmering synthesizer soliloquys.  With each minute the listener slips deeper into a dreamlike crystalline realm,  entranced,  recalling the ghost processionals first dreamed by Nocturnal Emissions in the late 80′s with albums like Cathedral.  This is minimalism that never bores,  indeed very tasteful.

The cover art,  a display a mannequin faces pictured in pink hue,  is oddly fitting,  and a perfect example of what sets this album apart from so many nature and space themed ambient albums,  there is a very personal and individual quality to this album that speaks to the alienating reality of solitary modern life more than reveals truths about the greater cosmic sphere. This is one of the greatest ambient recordings I’ve heard,  and a personal favorite.  Check out Elegant & Detached as well,  it’s just as wonderful. 5/5
(musiquemachine.com) 

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Lo que en las obras de Richard Chartier es silencio en su otro rostro es ruido cubierto con capas rugosas de notas que se rehúsan a desaparecer. El tercer trabajo de Pinkcourtesyphone continúa su trayecto en los rincones desconocidos del sueño, un sueño filmado en colores que se desgastan cada vez que una mirada intenta traspasar la pantalla. “A Ravishment Of Mirror” no son más que cuatro piezas, pero cada una de ellas a su vez contiene movimientos que van desplazándose lentamente hasta un abismo que atrapa el audio orgánico hacia si mismo. Las diferencias con los otros planos dibujados por Chartier son evidentes, sin embargo, los puntos que unen una vía de enfrentar una composición y otra también. El deslizamiento pausado y el exponer las células audibles más elementales esta presente en ambas entidades, pero en estos registros resultan levemente amplificados. En estas composiciones a una superficie de sonido ligero se suma otra que se adhiere a su cuerpo extendido y, sobre ella, varias más, generando una masa que se traslada a lo largo de los segundos desde un punto hacia otro, un avance lento que deja huellas de hierro líquido, y que además produce una fricción entre esas diversas superficies adosadas. Las melodías que interrumpen el ruido de fondo parecen animar una celebración de estrellas cuya piel se desliga del cuerpo inyectado de sustancias artificiales. El sample de una voz femenina invita a entrar en el sueño, lo mismo que una hipnótica melodía. Dos notas son las únicas guías que determinan el paso lento de los minutos que parecen horas perdidas. Ese es el tono que marca la primera parte de “Why Pretend / The Desire Of Absence / Faulty Connections”, una suite espectral de casi media hora, con sus variaciones al interior de las cintas desgastadas. La orquesta de acordes muertos paulatinamente va perdiendo su figura, para decantar en algo que no es música, sino más bien una sensación indescriptible, un estado narcótico de la mente, finalizando con haces de luz de neón enredándose con la luz de la ciudad. “Pixels… Sometimes… Broke Your Heart (For A.)” posee una estructura aún más extraña, solo ritmos intercalados en medio de una atmósfera borrosa e indescifrable. De nuevo, dentro de esta pieza se van generando movimientos unidos entre sí. El ritmo se quiebra y emerge un delicado, perturbadoramente frágil. “Sometimes… Sometimes… Sometimes…” se oye mientras la armonía que yace tras ella se destempla. “Falling Star (For P. Entwistle)” parece recoger la vida dentro de la ciudad, desde la intimidad de una habitación de hotel hasta las vastas carreteras de asfalto derretido, adornado con pianos oxidados y mujeres anónimas. Las melodías estáticas terminan por absorber el espacio circundante. “62,000 Valentines (For T. Hunter)”, luz y calor, oscuridad y resplandor velado en retroceso, superficies pétreas flexibles. “When I fall in love. When I fall in love…”, así hasta la eternidad.

“Los Ángeles, una ciudad de espejos, luces parpadeantes, historia obscura y profundos secretos es el nuevo hogar de Pinkcourtesyphone. Este tercer álbum explora los sueños y decepciones de Hollywood, para ser bebido a sorbos lentamente… Todos pretendemos, pero en Hollywood pretender es una substancia obscura, una unidad orgánica y plástica lista para ser desplegada y empacarte”. Las capas de sonidos orgánicos conforman una nueva entidad de música e imágenes que se desvelan dentro de sueños y melodías desvanecidas. Notas que se niegan a evaporar, notas transmutadas en resonancias distantes inmersas en el ruido agónico de fragmentos de luminosidad opaca.
(Hawai)

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I am afraid, 
I am a coward. 
I am sorry for everything. 
If I had done this a long time ago, 
it would have saved a lot of pain.

Cette note de suicide est celle de Peg Entwistle, jeune actrice américaine retrouvée morte sous le panneau Hollywood en 1932. À cette jeune femme, Richard Chartier dédie un des titres de son dernier album, publié sous l’entité pinkcourtesyphone : Falling Star. Le morceau, tout en échos indéchiffrables et fragments pianistiques, synthétise à lui seul la prouesse du musicien : entre beauté élégiaque et abysses délétères, l’album tout entier sonde l’âme humaine et son goût pour l’équivoque.

Avec le dernier morceau dédié à Tab Hunter, acteur américain, A Ravishment of Mirror semble confirmer son inspiration, la naissance de la gloire pelliculée en toile de fond. Pourtant, l’interprétation n’est pas si simple : Why Pretend / The Desire of Absence / Faulty Connections, le magistral morceau d’ouverture, ainsi que Pixels… Sometimes… Broke your heart, qui lui succède, lorgnent davantage vers une technologie contemporaine.

Point donc ici d’analyse historique, mais une topographie brumeuse du Narcisse moderne, né avec le XXè siècle, à la fois acteur et spectateur de sa propre déchéance. Séduisant, guindé, il sourit sans cesse en espérant tromper la mort, mais n’est jamais qu’un portrait flou, souvenir évanescent.

À grand thème, grand ouvrage : Chartier livre ici son disque le plus abouti, ode élégiaque et anxiogène aux milles subtilités, claustrophobique et vertigineuse, à ce mirage auquel l’homme aspire depuis qu’une caméra a posé son objectif sur lui. Le regard de l’autre et la solitude de son absence tapissent l’album de sentiments contradictoires, rendant l’écoute pour le moins déstabilisante.

A Ravishment of Mirror ouvre sur quelques poussiéreuses notes de musique orchestrale — qu’on croirait tirées d’un disque de Leyland Kirby, avant de les noyer dans une obscurité sans fin. Là où Kirby questionne le temps et son impact sur la beauté, Chartier approfondit : une fois la beauté disparue, que reste-t-il?
(dmute.net)

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Pinkcourtesyphone’s Foley Folly Folio, recorded between 1997 and 2011, is the debut by Chartier’s alter ego. Whereas releases under his own name are often about exploring specific artistic processes, the comparatively more maximalist and free-form Pinkcourtesyphone pieces wouldn’t sound out of place next to analog-ambient pioneers Tangerine Dream or early ’90s post-rave comedown music.

(The Washington Post, US)

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great work Pinky!
(Stephan Mathieu, German 78rpm vinyl enthusiast) 

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Modern minimalist hero and boss of the Line label, Richard Chartier, debuts his new guise Pinkcourtesyphone with one of the best things we’ve ever heard from the label – the outstanding Foley Folly Folio. It’s still purely electronic and relatively minimal in the wider sense of the word, but compared with his most stringent, process-based output, it could easily be deemed “maximalist”, or perhaps most suitably, Pop Ambient. It’s ostensibly a comfortable, luxurious, lounge-ready ambient exploration, but suffused with an unheimlich atmosphere manifesting in the same way that Lynch and Badalamenti, or even Boyd Rice’s subversive affections for the underlying darkness of tiki culture and the decadent fantasy of ’50s/’60s exotica wormed its way into post-rave and ’90s ambient music. It’s apparent in track titles such as ‘A Dark Room Full Of Plastic Plants’, and ‘All Made Up’, and best summed up in Line’s own words “Pinkcourtesyphone desires to capture the sonic essence of some nicely dressed 1960′s housewife wistfully peering out her window while reclining on some lovely couch or divan, with, of course, a slowly sipped cocktail and perhaps half of a valium. Perhaps she is waiting for the phone to ring.” But trustingly, Chartier coolly navigates beyond the seas of cheese thanks to his incredibly subtle electro-acoustic applications and patient, hallucinatory grasp of spatial dynamics. There are five tracks on offer, three of which last over 20 minutes, bookended by two shorter pieces – kinda like some five stage sleeping/dosing pattern – designed to seduce, manipulate and subconsciously transform your surroundings and mood with uncanny precision. Imagine Leyland Kirby, Mark Snow and Stephan Mathieu blurred on mogadon and whisky at the Nassau branch of the Stanley hotel, and you’re almost within grasp of this album’s dark allure. Strongly recommended.
(boomkat.com)

It is lovely and mysterious and ethereal, and definitely entrancing. I love it!
(Damiana Garcia, lady celebrity reporter extraordinaire) 

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Pinkcourtesyphone is the not so secret alter ego of renowned sound artist Richard Chartier, and while it seems to be geared more towards a looser, more relaxed sensibility than the serious artist guise that is usually thrust upon him, it lacks none of his careful attention to structure and detail. Quite a bit of the material on this compilation (recorded erratically between 1997 and 2011) could pass for his normal work, but throws enough curve balls to give it a distinct identity all its own.

While the imagery and mood conveyed seems to lean a bit into the world of camp, it never goes too far. It isn’t afraid to defy expectations either, however.  For example, the overt sampled voices on “Wistful Wishful Wanton” and “Afternoon Theme/Germs Through Wires/Evening Theme” would never pop up on a traditional Chartier composition, but here they work, even if they’re treated and layered into near indecipherability.

The textural, analog noises of “A Dark Room Filled With Plastic Plants,” however, isn’t that far removed from the style he’s known for, though the shift into almost uplifting, dreamy electronics at the end seems a bit more maximalist than I would have expected.  The same goes for the echoing, reverberated clicks and clacks of “Here is Something…That is Nothing,” which are occasionally disrupted by the almost techno-ish synth swells and jarring outbursts of sound.

The aforementioned “Afternoon Theme…” especially mixes things up, right from its opening of distant, jazzy horn like sounds and twittering, colorful electronics.  With the exception of some passages of dissonant, machinery hums, it is far more in line with musicality than the clinical studies of sound he usually does.  In general, the three long (20+ minute) pieces that make up the bulk of this album are surprisingly varied and dynamic, even if they often delve into quiet minimalism.

At first I was expecting Foley Folly Folio to be a bit more of a drastic departure from Richard Chartier’s normal work…for some reason I was bracing myself for disco beats and house music orchestral hits, but the result was not quite extreme as I thought.  In truth, it is probably all the better for that, and it does have a more relaxed, inviting feel overall.  While I like the usual detached, clinical approach to sound art that Chartier usually engages in just fine, the unpredictability of this one made it stand out as rather unique, compelling, and even a little fun at times.
(brainwashed.com)

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i’m totally amazed by the amount of detail in those tracks.  Simply superb!
(Yves De Mey, delightful Belgian sound artist)

splendid, a new expression, a humorous Chartier while retaining the quality he always maintains in his work. quel album sensuel!
(France Jobin, Quebecoise soundstress) 

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Absolutely wonderful music. 
(Pjusk, Norwegian electronicians) 

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Chartier takes a tangential trajectory to his usual electronic minimalism. The music is dreamy, evocative, with sonic transformations more poetic than formalistic. Significantly more accessible, almost facile at times, though we never leave the experimental music territory. A very enjoyable listen—honestly, Elegant & Detached’s 71 minutes went by very quickly.
(blog.monsieurdelire.com)

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Pinkcourtesyphone is the bizarrely-named alter-ego of Richard Chartier. There’s enough similarities between this and Chartier’s solo material that fans of his work will find a lot to dig into on Foley Folly Folio. Among many descriptions of Pinkcourtesyphone, perhaps the one that rings most true is “Pinkcourtesyphone operates like a syrupy dream.” This is especially true on the cryptic opener, “Wistful Wishful Wanton.” A looped, childlike voice endlessly repeats the line “The most wonderful night of my life” on top of a bed of melodic, slow-moving electronics. There’s an almost dystopian, sci-fi feeling to it with the cold and clinical nature that envelopes the piece. The album gets more menacing as it saunters ahead, crawling along at a glacial pace and filling in any discordant cracks. These pieces may be sprawling, but they’re quite dynamic as well. Foley Folly Folio acts as a separate, but still related, meditation on minimalism that Chartier does so well. Great cover art, too.
(experimedia.net)

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Ambient for the postwar suburban housewife. ”Formed from places, plastics and particulars” by sound artist Richard Chartier over several years, Foley Folly Folio is a soundtrack for the dawn of the self-medicating era, spread creamily like lipstick on plump lips. Late-afternoon Levittown ennui melts away as the sun vaporizes the last sprinkler droplets off the front lawn. A floral scent of Air Wick air freshener clouds her senses as she slips into her barbiturate haze. Hoping her husband gets home from work soon, she gazes through the window, down the street, identical houses each with a newly-planted sapling between curb and sidewalk. A young girl’s voice speaks of the “most wonderful night of my life” with Harlequin Romance breathlessness. Later, when the album begins to draw to a close, she will be whimpering, “It’s not supposed to be like this.”

“Here is Something…That is Nothing” is a confusion of thoughts settling down into fluidity, its atmospheric pressure dropping as it transmutes into “A Dark Room Full of Plastic Plants,” calm drifting in on an insubstantial, air-conditioned mist. But there is groaning coming from the unfinished basement, dredging up a grand ascent of fat, round notes. Each upward arc of euphoria is followed by a deep trough.

A suggestion of easy-listening music coming from the hi-fi is introduced by “Afternoon Theme” and loops in the air like cigarette smoke, doubling over itself until becoming an “Evening Theme” as candlelight and wine time approaches, and as the long shadows grow longer, things get creepy. The house is settling and strange noises are coming from the new Frigidaire. Woozy, recumbent, trapped at home in the Atomic Age, mother’s little helper is wearing off and still no sign of her husband.

This is a plush, original ambient album. Chartier develops his themes luxuriously and unsettlingly. A Barbie doll whose eyes follow you around the room from the shelf.
(igloomag.com)

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Line’s primary output is an intensive dissection (and reassembly) of sound. Each release comes wrapped in a thorough description of its context and purpose, and even though the label’s back catalogue amounts to an eclectic body of sound analysis, the premise that unites the releases is actually rather simple: Line asks the listener to listen, and be marvelled by what sound ismore than what it could be said to represent. In contrast, Pinkcourtesyphone sets up Line Segments to be open to a more fantastical, less analytical listening experience; this is Chartier’s weekend persona, stripped of his sonic labcoat and free to recline into casual attire.

The album is nonetheless informed by his impeccable handling of electronics. Much of the texture clings to the low frequencies like a mist, or buzzes gently like power cables threaded beneath the listener’s feet. These elements of the work feel earthly and serious, lapping over the boundary into Chartier’s more intensive sound explorations and adopting a more functional role within the soundscapes; they tweak the emotional hue of the surrounding shapes and establish the spatial dimensions of the album’s imagined environments.

Then there are the more elaborate – almost cartoonish – elements, through which Pinkcourtesyphone abandons the common threads of Line’s “traditional” output: cut up gloops of garish organ, futuristic sci-fi whistles, dreamy vocal samples, orchestrated shopping channel jingles looped into awkward waltzes. There’s a synthetic and materialistic quality – shiny surfaces, artificially sweet taste – and much of Foley Folly Folio feels as though it’s been ripped from a stiffly idealistic family home, built upon a symmetry and cleanliness that feels somewhat unsettling. Sometimes the work falls deeply into faceless, trivial daydreams for minutes at a time – billowing as pink ambient clouds and fluttering as frilly synthesizer curtain tails – and while this occasionally can cause listener interest to lapse, more often than not it only helps to strengthen Pinkcourtesyphone’s eerie plastic world.
(ATTNmagazine.co.uk)

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Unlike his past resonant microsound works, Foley Folly Folio begins with a hauntingly beautiful ambient piece, which after its five and a half-minute mark drops off into a ghostly echo of a forgotten place, exploring dying media and remnants of an aural presence. The sound eventually disintegrates into its digital counterparts made up of frequencies and bits, until it’s nothing but a barely audible hum of analog equipment, dark soundscapes, and reductionist atmospherics. Ah… there you are, Chartier…

Throughout the album Chartier explores this detached existence of suburban glamor, picked from the bits and pieces recorded during various years: 1997, 2004, and 2011. Drenched in pink hues of plastic mannequins, I can almost sence the presence of romanticism projected through the mind of a housewife [picture Betty Draper from Mad Men] , drowning in her FDA approved drug-infused haze. Perhaps she’s watching Oprah, or reading 50 Shades of Grey. But something dark and empty is hibernating behind her glass eyeballs. And as I catch a glimpse of dirt beneath her perfectly polished fingernails, a sense of coldness and unease descends upon this clinic scene.

Perhaps serving an aperitif of avant-garde textural sounds is what inspired Chartier to release Foley Folly Folio on his LINE imprint. Whatever the reasons – I’m happy to share the “most wonderful night of my life” in the company of my favorite minimalist artist, especially if he’s mixing up a delicious cocktail. Highly recommended for fans of The Caretaker,William Basinski, Black Swan, and Stephan Mathieu.
(headphonecommute.com) 

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Pinkcourtesyphone project attempts to inject a little glamour, humour, and gold lamé… The five tracks that make up Foley Folly Folio veer between the trippy looping vocal samples of “Wishful Wistful Wanton” through assorted, lusciously layered drifts of pulsing, shiny Ambient extravagance to the long, frankly annoying electronic loops that make up the penultimate three-part track, and the brief closing peculiarity of “All Made Up.” The album falls somewhere between “Little Fluffy Clouds”-era Orb and Eno at his most cheesily bland, but is the intention is to show a lighter. poppier side to Chartier, then the disc succeeds hands down.
(The Wire, UK)

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… en fin, parece querer realizar un particular homenaje a las Betty Draper de “Mad men”, pero por fortuna lo hace a su manera: superponiendo sintetizadores, efectos, samples manipulados de instrumentos acústicos y de (lo que parecen) voces humanas, para crear piezas en general largas y de poderosa carga atmosférica. Eso sí, que nadie espere una explosión de pop: comparado con el resto de su producción discográfica, “Foley folly folio” es un título mucho más asequible y disfrutable; un disco que no exige del oyente una inmersión total, pero que sigue conservando una elevadísima carga abstracta. Ideal para los que disfrutan con el ambient minimalista, pero no se atreven con el Chartier más radical. 
(GoMag, ES)

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Plenty of dark, minimal, throbbing industrialist space-drone, but a few of the remixers add more rhythmic elements. Frank Bretschneider adds a slowly growing 4/4 thump to his rework of “An Awaiting Room”, turning it into hissy Porter Ricks-y minimal techno. Sandwell District/Opal Tapes/Line affiliate Yves De Mey turns in a seriously deep, seriously stunning rework of “Singularity Version”, with rumbling bass tones, curdling static, and precise sheets of rhythmic static panning through the speakers. Pjusk’ “Pinkcourtesypjusk” is a nice, crisp, crackly little piece of steady, minimalist IDM. Simon Scott’s remix of “A Dark Room Full Of Plastic Plants” is shimmering drone, which slowly gets colder and more distant. In the album’s second half, Chartier collaborates quite unexpectedly with King Congo Powers, who adds spoken vocals to “Iamaphotograph”, which rides a slow automaton 4/4 beat and camera clicks. Creepy Autograph (AKA Jimmy Edgar) remixes this into a tense, buzzy orb, with Kid Congo’s vocals sounding ever more distorted and sinister. Onetime Coil associate CoH cuts “Iamaphotograph” further into an excellent sliced, fragmented rhythmic glitch-beat track, with stark piano upping the fright factor. S* and Tomas Phillips minimalize the track even further, mostly just keeping the camera flash noises and stretching out a dubby, clicky sinewave pulse beat. The album ends with “Move To Trash”, featuring Kid Congo’s distorted, disembodied voice intoning over another hypnotic, gazing minimal beat with shaker-like sounds. Spaced out, electrified sounds, perfectly complemented by the gorgeous space-themed artwork, which features a gatefold with a 3D cutout that holds the disc.
(theanswerisinthebeat.net on Please Pick Up)

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so far richard chartier has been focusing on minimal music very strictly but after 14 years, he’s trying pop elements with his other camp personality called ‘pinkcourtesyphone.’ I said POP, but his pop is not something you see on Ele-king. It is that physical elements meet ambient music like Marihiko Hara. ‘A Dark Room of Plastic Plants’ is like that you are stuck in a fish tank in an aquarium, and lose all sense of direction in the dark. ‘Here Is Something… That Is Nothing’ is like that you are in a submarine, and are overwhelmed with water pressure. ‘Afternoon Theme’ is like reverberations from the era of the Great Depression. Even though it is pop, as a sound artist position, it is still very heavy like something is leaning on. However, it makes you feel good, and you keep listening to them. I realized today that music doesn’t only make you feel relaxed. (japanese translation: soko hirayama)
(ele-king.net)

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The second half of the album is material performed with Kid Congo Powers (The Cramps, Gun Club) on vocals, which gives a very different feel to these songs.  Powers’ sinister, sleazy delivery on the cover of Amanda Lear’s “imaphotograph” has the right amount of creepy to tart it up, and with its rudimentary thud/white noise rhythmic backing resembles a stripped down mash up of Throbbing Gristle’s “United” and “Persuasion.”  “Move to Trash” is even creepier, with its lurching pace and Powers’ vocals tossing out one double entendre after the next.  Between these two songs, I was definitely catching a more modernist, avant garde Soft Cell vibe, with all of the underlying filth and perversion presented in their resplendent glory.  “iamaphotograph” appears in a few remixed versions, with each bringing out different musical elements:  Creepy Autograph’s mix brings up nasal sawtooth oscillators and a bit of arpeggiated synth, while CoH chooses to cut up and fragment the voices extensively.  Like most remixes, they expand on different parts of the original work, but never surpass it.

I am a long time fan of Chartier’s more serious, academic tinged work, but the development and expansion of Pinkcourtesyphone is a different beast entirely.  The inclusion of more conventional bits, such as overt rhythmic passages and the use of vocals go a long way and help solidify the singular identity of the project.  I do not figure Chartier will leave his more serious artist career behind, nor would I want him to, so PCP makes for the perfect side project that continues to develop its own distinct identity.
(brainwashed.com on Please Pick Up)

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Using the language of the cinema, we can say that the creator of this album, Richard Chartier is a master at building mood and tension. Without the participation of the essential features of Angelo Badalamenti recordings are in the middle of Mulholland Drive. Prominence of this music lies mainly in a climate built by silence and looped voices. The technique smacks of banality, but the precision with which this takes place is breathtaking.
(eyebient.tumblr.com)

Imagínese un disco creado como un cuento de hadas tenebroso, donde siniestras atmósferas viajan entre estrepitosos espacios cargados de misterio que no llega a asustar, de lo contrario, permiten poner a soñar los oídos, como refugiándose entre formas sutiles de narrativos ambientes que entre el humor y lo glamoroso, encuentran un lugar plácido para la mente.

Así es Foley Folly Folio, el más reciente trabajo de pinkcourtesyphone, un alias del conocido Richard Chartier, donde abandona un poco el recurrente minimalismo y reducción digital que acostumbra presentar, para entregar una faceta más oscura que pese a construirse a partir de varias capas de sonidos, conserva lo simple y lo sutil que ya se conoce a menudo en el artista, en este caso con expresiones más volátiles y fantasmagóricas.

El disco es extenso, llevándose casi 70 minutos de duración, entre los que el compositor crea una historia de barridos extensos de sonido, donde se camuflan diversas voces procesadas, sonidos digitales y todo tipo de elementos microscópicos, primando el detalle y la delicadeza que juegan rol especial. Es un disco lleno de sorpresas, donde pese a existir una calmada estructura de alargados cortes y lentas transformaciones, se obtiene una narrativa única que llevará al oyente a una deliciosa velada de introspección.
(azterisco.com)

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No es que de la noche a la mañana el compositor norteamericano haya traicionado su discurso o se haya desviado de su camino, pero la sensación es que, dentro de su contexto expresivo, Foley Folly Folio es la grabación más accesible y generosa de su trayectoria. Se entiende, además, que precisamente venga en forma de otro proyecto al margen de su carrera en solitario, que siempre permite mayor libertad de movimientos y despeja las dudas que pueda generar en uno mismo. En Pinkcourtesyphone, Chartier sigue transitando por los bosques frondosos y angostos del ambient, pero aquí llena más los espacios, juega más con las capas y los sonidos y, sobre todo, esparce más gas sonoro y más melodías en sus canciones. En las pistas de inicio y despedida del disco,“Wistful Wishful Wanton” y “All Made Up”, es donde más se explicita este paso hacia delante en la búsqueda de un discurso más evocador y tangible: son dos bellísimas composiciones de ambient planeador, melódico y espectral que enlazan emocional y musicalmente con el Angelo Badalamenti más paisajístico y, sobre todo, con Leyland Kirby.

Y es que la impresión que deja este magnífico disco es que Kirby ha sido una influencia primordial en la constitución de este proyecto: a lo largo y ancho del álbum sobrevuela el espíritu de su ambient misterioso y evanescente, pero sobre todo su capacidad para dejar poso en sus reconstrucciones nostálgicas. Pinkcourtesyphone no alcanza las cotas de belleza e intensidad emocional de Kirby o su alter ego The Caretaker, eso debe quedar claro para evitar chascos, pero busca su inspiración y su esencia, y ahí estriba el factor clave para que por primera vez sintamos la música de Richard Chartier más cercana y mundana, en la mejor acepción posible que puedan tener ambos términos. Especialmente recomendado para devoradores de música ambient con proyección orgánica y emocional.
(playgroundmag.com)

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on Elegant & Detached: Pinkcourtesyphone is very cinematic to me and it’s easy to imagine something dark going on in a black & white movie with wonderful stars from the past, you know the way they don’t do them anymore…

The first track “petraglyph (for Ranier)” starts with a womans voice speaking German with a delay/echo on her voice so you just can make out what she say’s. And i have an inkling to that the Rainer mentioned in the title has something to do with Mr. Fassbinder and his film “Die bitteren Tränen der Petra von Kant“. And if that is so and you know your Fassbinder you also get the picture about something dark going on… Well this bitter sweet track drifts along a drone like bass that just adds to the charm while that females voice repeats it self at times during it’s 12:14 minutes.

And so this album goes along with even more cinematic paraphernalia, masterfully crafted sounds and field recordings with a never dull moment ever!You are left wanting more when this album closes with the track “sans many things (bedtime)” a rhythmic track considering what you might be used to from Mr. Chartier. A thumping dark sound repeats it self together with a sort of synced ping sound and electric currents adding to the drama just to ebb out to almost from here to eternity while sitting on the edge of forever…

And I’m not going to write about the other very beautiful tracks of this album just to keep you curious and will leave you with the short version of what you will get when buying this album… Very pretty, Pretty-Pretty…
(impuls-media.net)

Romantic and elegant ambient sound produced with thin layers, a delicate feel with subtle melodies. For anyone who likes a transient, dreamy ambient, such as Grouper and William Basinski, this is recommended.
(Doppleganger Records, JP)

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Ambient come difficilmente la sentirete. Rivoltata dall’interno, dissezionata, infarcita di citazioni fumettistiche: variopinti cut up organistici, inserzioni sci-fi, sample vocali sognanti, jingle orchestrali da balera. L’autore? Un Richard Chartier che non ti aspetteresti. “Pinkcourtesyphone” è un’operazione che una tantum finisce per ribaltare, in maniera ironica e fine, le coordinate estetiche dell’intero catalogo LINE, spostando il tiro dalla raffinata entomologia microsonica a cui si ispira il manifesto dell’etichetta del sound artist di Washington, ad un habitat sonoro che richiede un ascolto molto meno analitico, in cui emerge una sorprendente vena fantastica, infarcita di elementi plastici e sintetici. Un piccolo quadro di postmodernismo digitale. 
(Blow Up, Italy)

Este es el hilo conductor que lleva al segundo trabajo de Richard Chartier a incorporarse dentro de un sello tan cercano musicalmente y que él bien ya conoce como es el australiano Room 40, sello regentado por otro garn nombre del género ambiental como es Lawrence English, donde ya editó en nombre propio “A Field for Mixing” (2010). Al mismo tiempo,  Chartier abre las puertas de su casa editorial Line para que Lawrence English debute en éste con “For/Not For John Cage”. Si nos adentramos en Elegant & Detached”, podemos imaginarnos coo Chartier evoluciona su obra bajo unos parámetros cercanos a The Caretaker , aunque con influencias distintas, que buscan en la elegancia de las imágenes de otras épocas el lugar donde recrear bandas sonoras imaginarias. Es como reimaginar aquellos universos desde ángulos imposibles en aquella época, para ello deja que largas composiciones nos dibujen ese espacio y nos introduzcan en esa atmósfera intercalando voces y mensajes crítpticos.

La línea en este segundo trabajo, tiene una llamada desde latitudes germanófilas con “Petraglyph (for Ranier)” (y yo me pregunto, ¿será Fassbinder?) donde las voces navegan sin encontrarse y llegar a establecer un diálogo, distantes ecos flotan entre las atmósferas creadas en esa suerte de sueño al que nos hacía referencia en su definición del disco. Aunque se hable de azucarado, hay lugar para las pesadillas y la intriga al final de este tema, convirtiendo los ecos en reverberaciones que encierran atmósferas cercanas a lo mortecino y casi salpicado en ese tramo por Kreng o Blackest Ever Black. Descorazonador. La segunda, no lo es menos. “Sans Motif/ Closer to Here than You Care to Be”, el tono atemorizante y pesadillesco con el reloj resonando va abriendo camino a un tono dulce y neoclásico que te envuelve hasta de nuevo dejarte caer hacia un pozo donde vuelve a tomar ese tono cercano a The Haxan Cloak o Raime, aunque esos breves apuntes no dejan que la tragedia suceda, más bien acaban siendo como una pesadilla y cuya sensación de bienestar al escapar de ella es la que se apodera del final de la composición, un drone cristalino y elevador. “ An Awaiting Room (for Tati)/ Stars Fell” (ahora nos preguntamos, ¿Jacques Tati?) es la más extensa dentro de éste disco y la verdad, es imposible definir en pocas palabras las sensaciones y atmósferas que encierra este corte.

Quizás, es también parte del juego que nos propone Chartier con este alias, suceder atmósferas e interpretar distintos registros casi como se tratase de la sucesión de escenas del cine y bajo su óptica cabe la belleza, debe enfrentarse también a lo desconocido y reconocer sus propios miedos. Es una virtud, que lo aleja de los discos de preciosismo ambient que se han ido acumulando en diferentes sellos durante los últimos años. “Elegant & Detached”, tiene la virtud de escaparse de todo ese pelotón e imaginar nuevos lenguajes dentro del género. Prueba de ello, “Sans Many Things” . Pieza que expande toda esa dinámica rítmica oscurantista a la que hacíamos alusión anteriormente y que lo acerca a Coil, Mordant Music, Vatican Shadow, Blackest Ever Black, Silent Servant pero obviamente sin la agresividad obsesiva de todos ellos, más bien remitiéndonos a su faceta ambiental. Cuando termina este disco, te gustaría ser capaz de decir muchas cosas al igual que la voz perdida que lo cierra, pero no se decirte cuales son ni cuales vas a ser capaz de imaginarte, pero te recomiendo que las descubras.
(Conconceptoradio.net)

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Typically, Chartier’s music has been austere to say the least. His last under his proper name,Transparency (Performance), featured tightly wound chamber arrangements of his supremely reduced sounds. I’d liken his music to an Ad Reinhardt painting… subtle and purist, requiring a fair amount of attention to the details, and reveling in the absence of much. If Chartier’s music is an Ad Reinhardt painting, then under the guise of pinkcourtesyphone it’s something more akin to a Mark Rothko. Airy but abstract, dreamlike and organic, like a hazy cloud. It’s not surprising that Chartier felt compelled to start a separate offshoot of Line for this release, allowing him to veer pretty generously out of bounds of the usual Line aesthetic. While these pieces may be more gaseous, they are by no means less controlled or measured; Chartier’s is a careful hand. Some of the ethereal loops and disembodied voices that permeate Foley Folly Folio recall the ghostly sounds of The Caretaker, but there is far less schtick here. “Wishful Wistful Wanton” is a lovely prologue, fully of breathy, disembodied female whispers and droning loops. “Here Is Something… That Is Nothing” takes its own sparseness not without a wink, it would seem. Still, it’s quite compelling as an ethereal, spacious wander. Perhaps my favorite stretch of Foley Folly Folio is in the second half of “A Dark Room Full of Plastic Plants,” with a subtle, looped bass section that recalls muffled strings. Much of this album passes by like a dream, more of a series of impressions and afterimages than a concise series of works. The contradiction of Chartier’s methodical repertoire and deliberate hand versus the nebulous finished form of these pieces makes Foley Folly Folio a strangely beguiling album, one highly worth a listen.
(Ear Influxion) 

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Elegant & Detached ha preparado un cóctel de sonidos extraños, habitaciones nocturnas, voces susurrantes, desde la distancia y con una distinción misteriosa. Largas piezas de ambient fantasmagórico, ecos lejanos de fantasmas. Un clima que a veces llega a ser sofocante, lejos del mutismo que le es propio, en donde construye jardines rotos de partículas desintegradas, ambientaciones de escenas sin lógica aparente, donde no importa que se dice sino como se relata la historia. Accidentes y cuadros fracturados en la mitad de la noche iluminada. Cada trazo esta ubicado debajo de una capa de ruido sucio, que a su vez se ubica por sobre otra capa más, y así hasta más no poder, actuando como filtro contra la mugre que de todas maneras permanece como una presencia asombrosa. “Petraglyph (For Ranier)” se inicia con una voz incógnita hablando en lengua alemana, y tan pronto se calla, comienzan a arrastrase las láminas de texturas ásperas. Así es como el sonido se sucede, arrastrándose por el suelo, empujando las notas con una letanía de un muerto viviente. “Sans Motif / Closer To Here Than You Care To Be” también contiene samples de personas anónimas, desconocidas al menos para nosotros. Las cosas no son lo que parecen. a ratos simula ser un techno desprovisto de cualquier ritmo, a veces muy similar a los paisajes gaseosos de Wolfgang Voigt, una presencia siempre en la sombra de la electrónica espectral. Recursos sacados de discos de exótica, residuos de un sonido resquebrajado. “An Awaiting Room (For Tati) / Stars Fell”toma ese sonido desprolijo, como una demo mal grabado, característico de Rhythm & Sound, y lo lleva hasta un lugar mas frío, y luego aun más allá: son tres partes en una sola pieza -esta, de veintitrés minutos-. “Millimeters Off / Non Us (Tiny)” traslada el misterio hasta un estado opresivo, la más abrasiva de todas, estado que se ve distendido con “Sans Many Things (Bedtime)” y unos textos, siempre femeninos, que cierran la habitación por fuera, sin saber como estos susurros se cuelan por debajo de la puerta. “La voz de las personas que llaman susurran una nostálgica pero falsa carta de amor al cine de la estética de un lugar lejano sobre las cosas que hiciste… y las cosas que necesitas que se hagan”Elegant & Detached fue, es, un disco que exacerba las posibilidades seductoras de la otra ruta seguida por Chartier.
(hawai.wordpress.com) 

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Il nuovo alias di Richard Chartier denota una volontà da parte del musicista americano di dare una svolta alla sua carriera: dopo aver indagato l’immaterialità del suono, Chartier sembra ora interessato all’organicità del mondo materiale. La prospettiva è comunque quella di un artista attratto dai processi astrattivi e dai labirinti della mente, anche se la pasta dei suoni con cui Pinkcourtesyphone colora le cinque tracce di Elegant & Detached sono caldi come mai lo sono stati in passato. Voci trattate, drones accecanti, rumori che si specchiamo quelle di Chartier sembrano descrizioni di sogni ad occhi aperti. IL NUOVO CORSO DI UN VISIONARIO.
(r0ckerilla.com) 

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Elegant & Detached is the second album by american soundartist Richard Chartier under his moniker Pinkcourtesyphone. In contradiction to the minimalistic works i know under his name of birth, these tracks not only sound nearly orchestral by the use of big reverbitory rooms. The mysterious cimematic ambiences and gloomy, dreamlike blurred and blown away loops-based drones made of field recordings, synth sounds and ingeniously applied (rhythmical) noise along with vocal samples from Fassbinder films are utterly atmospheric creating a strong effect.
(de:Bug, DE) 

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on ELEGANT & DETACHED: Compared to the works he releases under his own name, thePinkcourtesyphone obviously gives room for some more playful, associative and humorous soundscapes… But that does not mean these soundscapes should not be taken seriously: they are very adventurous and cinematic, so this 70 minute album is a delightful pleasure to listen to.
(ambientblog.com) 

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on ELEGANT & DETACHED:
has the lightness of swedish Air France and sublime taste of 60s cinema. Hitchcock on top form. #13 on TOP 15 AMBIENT ALBUMS OF 2012

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It has been a while since we have talked about Richard Chartier. A decade, no less. In ten years the American has been more than active, releasing many records under his own name or within different projects with heavyweights such as Taylor Deupree, Kim Cascone and Asmus Tietchens. But this time, he appears under the pseudonym Pinkcourtesyphone, a 100% ambient project. Elegant and Detached is the second instalment of fluffy clouds and ramblings from Chartier under this curious name, Pinkcourtesyphone. While Foley Folly Folio was released on Line (which is his own label), Chartier turned to Lawrence English and the label Room 40 to release this disc. 

A wise choice as Room 40 is currently one of the best labels of the genre. However, it is not because one’s work finds a home on one of the most reputable label, that one has achieved an incomparable album. Fortunately, Room 40 has a rigorous editorial process that leaves nothing to chance and Richard Chartier, is not a first comer as well. Therefore, we can take this record seriously without unrolling the red carpet. And really, it is not so bad, ambient discs that resemble each other is not what’s missing these days, and we would have been disappointed that Richard Chartier fall into this kind of pitfall.

So it is with a certain happiness that we observe that Elegant and Detached is a disc built on a solid constitution and its beauty goes beyond such platitudes (above ). Made of samples, field recordings, cavernous electronic processing and using voice to add an additional aesthetic but is by no means “filling”. Indeed, each sound element of the music of Richard Chartier are inseparable and does not resemble overlays as is often the case. A work with strong tonal accents, Elegant and Detached offers innovative aesthetics that even, at low volume, remains the same and is filled with nuances, textures, a refined construction and the work on the voice is most judicious. So yes, the terminology used for the name of the album is most suitable. It is about elegance and self-detachment. Chartier acts to re-give meaning to ambient, giving it the colour it should have never lost before falling into a lifeless greyness . In fact, this kind of reaction is not unique and there is not only Richard Chartier left to worry about the renewal of the idea of “ambient”, but Elegant and Detached is among those, offering the best tracks.
(liabilitywebzine.com)

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on ELEGANT & DETACHED:  a beautiful work that’s perhaps too remote & unemotional… It’s quite a beautiful, august and slightly unsettling recording at times, but whether many listeners will play it often, apart from the odd art gallery opening or two, is another issue.”
(thesoundprojector.com)

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on FOLEY FOLLY FOLIO: Incredible journey to the fairy-tale worlds. Alice in Wonderland? Who killed Laura Palmer? #3 on TOP 15 AMBIENT ALBUMS OF 2012
(eyebient.tumblr.com)